#French bulldog owner in Australia slugged with $37k vet bill #Usa #Miami #Nyc #Houston #Uk #Es

#French bulldog owner in Australia slugged with $37k vet bill #Usa #Miami #Nyc #Houston #Uk #Es

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The owners of a French bulldog have called out a veterinarian hospital after being forced to fork out $37,000 to save their dog’s life.

Sydneysiders Daniele and Sabrina are the proud owners of a five-year-old French bulldog named Matisse.

The couple bought the registered pet for $5,000 from a reputable breeder. However, soon after, their dog started having health issues.

Daniele and Sabrina noticed Matisse’s back legs had become ‘wobbly’ on Easter Saturday and took her to the vet twice on the same day, but she was sent home.

Then the couple rushed Matisse to Sydney Veterinary Emergency & Specialists after Sabrina noticed the little dog was in a lot of pain and was struggling to breathe.

Daniele (left) and Sabrina (right) rushed their five-year-old French bulldog to the vet after they noticed her back legs were 'wobbly' and she had difficulty breathing

Daniele (left) and Sabrina (right) rushed their five-year-old French bulldog to the vet after they noticed her back legs were 'wobbly' and she had difficulty breathing

Daniele (left) and Sabrina (right) rushed their five-year-old French bulldog to the vet after they noticed her back legs were ‘wobbly’ and she had difficulty breathing 

Matisse (pictured) was taken to Sydney Veterinary Emergency & Specialists where doctors performed tests, CT scans and life-saving spinal surgery

Matisse (pictured) was taken to Sydney Veterinary Emergency & Specialists where doctors performed tests, CT scans and life-saving spinal surgery

Matisse (pictured) was taken to Sydney Veterinary Emergency & Specialists where doctors performed tests, CT scans and life-saving spinal surgery 

The pair were told Matisse needed to stay the night to be stabilised and were asked to sign some documents and leave a $3,000 deposit.

Matisse needed scans, tests, round-the-clock monitoring and surgery to save her life – all of which came at a high cost.

‘Unfortunately, these French bulldogs are ticking time bombs,’ Sabrina told A Current Affair on Monday.

‘They just put her under oxygen, and it went downhill from there.’

The couple did not have pet insurance and was first quoted $8,900 for Matisse’s treatment.

However, Daniele said the bill kept getting ‘higher and higher’ until it reached a whopping $36,896.19 for six days spent at the vet.

The three-page itemised bill included $3,250 for spinal surgery, $2,750 for CT scans, $44 for 15 paracetamol tablets and a public holiday surcharge of $4,084.07.

‘I couldn’t believe it. It’s a massive, massive bill so we’re just asking them to reconsider.’

Daniele said the vet would not reconsider the price but decided to let Matisse go home after he offered them $29,0000 – some of which came from the sale of Sabrina’s designer handbags.

‘I said, ‘If I can get you the money, can you give us the dog?’ And she goes, ‘Ok, well we’re happy with that’,’ Daniele said.

‘Prada, Louis Vuitton, Gucci,’ Sabrina said. ‘I had to sell a few designer handbags that I didn’t really want to part with. You do what you have to do.’

Matisse spent six days at the veterinarian hospital for treatment which cost her owners $36,896.19

Matisse spent six days at the veterinarian hospital for treatment which cost her owners $36,896.19

Matisse spent six days at the veterinarian hospital for treatment which cost her owners $36,896.19

In a statement, Sydney Veterinarian Emergency & Specialists (SVES) said Daniele and Sabrina were made aware of and consented to the cost before treatment.

‘Our hospital is a Specialty and Emergency Hospital and provides the highest level of care by a team of Specialist Veterinary Surgeons, often in emergency situations,’ SVES said.

‘As is our standard practice, the client was made aware of and consented to the cost for this unique and critical case prior to treatment after choosing between alternative treatment options.

‘The client also obtained a second opinion with an independent third party about the proposed treatment and costs prior to consenting to the cost of the surgery.’

Sydney Veterinarian Emergency & Specialists (pictured) explained Matisse received a standard of care equal to that provided to a human in a critical care unit

Sydney Veterinarian Emergency & Specialists (pictured) explained Matisse received a standard of care equal to that provided to a human in a critical care unit

Sydney Veterinarian Emergency & Specialists (pictured) explained Matisse received a standard of care equal to that provided to a human in a critical care unit

SVES explained Matisse received a standard of care equal to that provided to a human in a critical care unit. 

‘Matisse presented in a critical condition requiring lifesaving intensive care and treatment for breed specific complications,’ SVES said.

‘This included intubation, diagnostic imaging, complex spinal surgery and 24/7 one on one nursing care during his treatment.

‘The standard of care was equal to what would be provided to a human in a critical care unit.’

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk




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